1. Home
  2. /
  3. FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you have questions? We have answers! Below are the answers to the most frequently asked questions. If you don’t see what you need, simply contact us and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

Contacting Braille

Our manufacturing facilities are located in Sarasota Florida and our European office is in Munich, Germany. Visit our contact page for full details

You can contact customer service by filling out the contact us form or contacting us at info@braillebattery.com.

Search for one of our Master Distributors/Stockists for Braille products.

You can follow us on any of our social media pages. Find the links on our contact page.

Battery Technology

We use Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4) cells (also known as LFP) which provides higher energy density and better electrical performance, higher cranking amps, and faster recharge times than lead-acid batteries.

A Battery Management System, or BMS, keeps a battery operating within normal parameters. Braille Battery does not use a BMS because it is another possible point of failure in batteries, thereby reducing overall reliability. Plus adding a BMS, increases the weight of a battery and can increase the size of the battery case.

Instead, all our cells have a current interrupt device (CID) integrated into the top of the cell to mechanically disconnect the current flow through the cell if it experiences abnormal operating conditions.

Most lithium-ion batteries will see a weight reduction of approximately 75% compared to lead-acid/AGM batteries of the same size.

Battery Safety

All Braille battery models have undergone rigorous internal testing for quality and safety assurance. The internal cells are tested to UN 1632 standards and are individually tested at our factory in Sarasota, Florida for quality assurance before being built into a battery. The batteries are also tested to UN 38.3 safety standards to ensure they are safe for transportation by any method (land, air, and sea), and are packaged in accordance with all applicable packing standards to ensure they do not receive any damage during transportation.

A Battery Management System, or BMS, keeps a battery operating within normal parameters. Braille Battery does not use a BMS because it is another possible point of failure in batteries, thereby reducing overall reliability. Plus adding a BMS, increases the weight of a battery and can increase the size of the battery case.

Instead, all our cells have a current interrupt device (CID) integrated into the top of the cell to mechanically disconnect the current flow through the cell if it experiences abnormal operating conditions.

You cannot shock yourself by touching the terminals, as the voltage/amperage is not high enough. You can, however, be shocked if you are attaching the battery cables in an improper/dangerous way. If you are not comfortable attaching your battery to your car, seek assistance from a professional to ensure you do not harm yourself, or cause unnecessary damage to the battery or your vehicle.

Braille batteries do not release any carcinogens or toxic substances under normal operating conditions. If abnormal operating conditions occur and the battery is breached, it is possible that a small amount of lithium gas will be released, but it will not be in a high enough concentration to harm you, or those around you.

All Braille battery models have undergone rigorous internal testing for quality and safety assurance. The internal cells are tested to UN 1632 standards and are individually tested at our factory in Sarasota, Florida for quality assurance before being built into a battery. The batteries are also tested to UN 38.3 safety standards to ensure they are safe for transportation by any method (land, air, and sea), and are packaged in accordance with all applicable packing standards to ensure they do not receive any damage during transportation.

No. Under normal operating parameters Braille Battery will not catch on fire, explode, etc. Under abnormal operating conditions, Braille batteries are equipped with an integrated safety device known as a Current Interrupt Device (CID) that will mechanically disconnect the cells inside of the battery to ensure catastrophic failures such as fires and explosions do not occur.

If the battery is attached in the wrong way (positive to negative cable, negative to positive cable) it can cause serious damage to your car and its electrical system. Ensure you look at the markings on the battery label and check the polarity with a voltmeter if possible, by touching the positive lead to the positive terminal of the battery, and the negative lead to the negative terminal. If the voltage registers as positive, you have the correct polarity.

Battery Maintenance

You will need to purchase a charger specifically made for lithium-ion batteries. Some chargers have the capability to change between lead-acid and lithium-ion, but that will depend on the charger that you purchase. We recommend purchasing a Braille Battery charger, as we know the program is specifically set for proper charging and maintenance of lithium-ion batteries.

Most lithium-ion chargers have maintenance modes that will prevent over charging. We recommend looking for this specification (also known as trickle charging, float charging, or maintenance) to ensure you do not damage the battery during the charging. We recommend purchasing a Braille Battery charger, as we know the program is specifically set for proper charging and maintenance of lithium-ion batteries.

Yes. As our batteries do not include a BMS system, you can over-discharge the battery and cause permanent damage, and possibly make the battery inoperable. The minimum voltage you can discharge the battery to is 8V for a 12V battery, or 10V for a 16V battery. Anything below these levels can damage the cells and lower the lifespan of the battery drastically.

Braille batteries have an average lifespan of 8-12 years under normal conditions. Through proper care and maintenance (not over-discharging, charging when not in use, using a Braille charger), some customers have seen as high as 15 years of life in their batteries.

Lithium-ion batteries have a slightly different charging profile than AGM. The batteries should be charged up to 14.4V, and then should be reduced to 13.8V for continued charging/maintenance.

We recommend, at a minimum, disconnecting your battery from your car to ensure there is no draw during extreme cold weather. Charging or discharging lithium-ion batteries when they are cold decreases the lifespan of the battery and can lead to permanent damage if done at an extreme rate during the cold.

As long as the exterior of the battery does not exceed 140°F/60°C, the battery will work perfectly in hot weather. Make sure to keep the battery out of the sun for extended periods of time, as this can heat the case up dramatically.

Battery Terms

This is a rating used to describe the discharge load in amperes which a new, fully charged battery at 32 degrees F (OC), can continuously deliver for 30 seconds and maintain a terminal voltage equal or greater than 1.2 volts per cell. It is sometimes referred to as Marine Cranking Amps or Cranking Amps.

BCI has established testing procedures for battery specifications of CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) and CA (Cranking Amps).

At this time all of Braille’s ratings are determined by using a conductance tester and not the draw down

Reserve Capacity, (RC) is a battery industry rating, defining a battery’s ability to power a vehicle with an inoperative alternator or fan belt. The rating is the number of minutes a battery at 80 degrees F can be discharged at 25 amps and maintain a voltage of 70.5 volts for a 72 volt battery. The higher the reserve rating, the longer your vehicle can operate should your alternator or fan belt fail.

BCI is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote the interests of the international lead-acid battery industry. With more than 175 members worldwide, BCI brings together representatives of many of the kinds of businesses that are involved in the lead-acid battery life cycle, including manufacturers and recyclers, marketers and retailers, suppliers of raw materials and equipment, and industry consultants.

BCI is the authoritative source of battery-related information in many areas. Through its committees and research arms, it researches, develops and publishes technical data, engineering standards, marketing practices, trade issues and governmental and legislative initiatives.

BCI has established testing procedures for battery specifications of CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) and CA (Cranking Amps).

You will note that we mention that many companies choose Braille Battery’s as OEM products for their cars. OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer, referring to the maker of the battery. OEM batteries are often referred to as “original” batteries. Manufactures will choose batteries as OEM based on a variety of factors including cost, weight and performance.

A cycle is considered one discharge and one charge sequence for a rechargeable battery.

A volt is the unit of measure for electrical potential or pressure.

A watt is the unit for measuring electrical power (Watts= Amperes x Volts).

If a battery was a motor, cranking amps refer to the horsepower of the engine, whereas AH (amp hours) are the amount of fuel in the tank. To test the amount of “fuel” in the tank, the battery is tested to determine the amount of amperage available when discharged evenly over a 20-hour period. The amp hour rating is cumulative, so to know how many constant amps the battery will output for 20 hours, you have to divide the amp hour rating by 20. For example: If a battery has an amp hour rating of 75, dividing by 20 equals 3.75. That battery can carry a 3.75-amp load for 20 hours before dropping to 70.5 volts. A battery with an amp hour rating of 55 will carry a 2.75-amp load for 20 hours before dropping to 10.5 volts.

Higher ratings do not necessarily reflect how fast current can be drawn, rather, how long a current can be drawn. For example, a 20Ah battery will sustain a 1-amp draw for approximately 20 hours before dropping to a voltage level that is considered discharged. A 40Ah battery will sustain an 8-Amp draw (or load) for approximately five hours. Capacity is influenced by other factors such as temperature, depth of discharge and speed of discharge.

When a battery is in a fully charged state it stores electrical energy. The amount of usable energy in this state to perform a function will vary greatly depending on factors such as load, time, and temperature.

In a lead-acid battery, the amount of the load will greatly affect the battery’s usable capacity, which is based on the Peukert equation. The ability for lead-acid batteries to sustain a load is relative to the specific battery’s capacity. A typical lead-acid battery will experience an extreme voltage drop when a heavy load is placed on the battery. Often, if the load exceeds the battery’s sustainable ability, the battery’s voltage will drop to an unusable level and the battery will fail.

Due to vast improvements in electrical ability found in Braille’s Lithium Battery Technology, the usable capacity of Braille’s lithium batteries are able to sustain over 10.2 volts under load. This is, on average, the same as lead-acid batteries with 3 times the standard capacity rating. This usable power rating, represented by voltage under load, is called a Lithium Amp Hour rating (LAH).

The Lithium Amp Hour rating can be used as a guide to help determine the correct battery when attempting to achieve premium weight and size benefits using Braille Lithium Batteries. For example, if a 30 AH, lead-acid battery is currently being used, it may be upgraded with a 30 LAH rating Braille Lithium Battery, which under equal loads, will deliver similar draw down performance. While the Lithium Amp Hour (LAH) rating is very useful for providing an insight into the advanced performance of Braille’s Lithium Batteries, it is not a replacement measurement for the traditional AH rating, which should be used to determine charging rates, total discharge performance, and long-term storage calculations.

The C-Rate is the level at which a battery/cell is able to be charged and discharged in relation to its Ah rating (ex. charging a 5 Ah battery at 10A is the equivalent of a 2C charging rate→10/5=2C).

The C-Rate of the battery, both in relation to charging and discharging, is important as it tells us about the speed at which we can charge and discharge a battery without causing damage to the cell internals. For total-loss systems (no alternator), this means either a shorter or longer recharge time between races.

A battery lifespan is the number of times a battery is able to be charged to 100% SOC (14.4V) and then discharged to 0% SOC (8V) before 20% of the starting capacity is lost.

Impedance is the resistance the current experiences as it flows through the battery.

Cranking amps and impedance are inversely proportional, so decreasing the impedance of a battery increases the cranking amps.

Pulse Cranking Amps is a measurement of the current a fully charged battery, at a temperature of 70°F or higher, can deliver for 5 seconds while maintaining a voltage greater than or equal to 7.2V.

One of the key aspects of a starter battery is its ability to provide a large number of amps to turn over the engine (usually between 250 – 600 amps), and to provide energy for the electrical systems of the car.

Lithium-ion batteries do not accept a charge at <32°/0°C, so their use at this extreme temperature in not recommended. Since lithium-ion batteries do not perform well in extreme cold and can actually be damaged through use in this weather, cold cranking amps (measured at 32°/0°C) do not apply to measuring lithium-ion batteries.

Cold Cranking Amps is a rating used to give an approximation of a battery’s ability to start an engine in cold temperatures. The higher the CCA rating, the greater the potential starting power of the battery in colder weather. Braille Battery’s are tested using conductance testing which is an approximation of BCI testing.

The BCI rating is the number of amps a new, fully charged battery can deliver at 0° Fahrenheit for 30 seconds, while maintaining a voltage of at least 7.2 volts, for a 72 volt battery using a draw down test. Since this type of testing can shorten the life of a battery, Braille’s batteries are individually tested prior to shipping using the conductance method. This method is much faster and less destructive to batteries.

The voltage a battery is able to maintain while subjected to a power draw.

Many electrical systems require a certain voltage to continue operating. If the voltage drops below a certain threshold, the electrical system will shut off. This is especially important for capacity-based batteries.

Looking for a customised lithium battery solution?

Designed, built and tested in the US, we are a leader in racing and performance. We can help build customised solutions using lithium-ion technology. Tell us about your project and we’ll connect you to our engineering team.